Local nonprofits partner to help a family in need

Published 12:13 pm Tuesday, August 2, 2022

Operation Hope, Habitat for Humanity prove that two helpers are better than one

 

When moving to a small town, people often wonder how their new neighbors will come together when a family is in need. Landrum proved it has earned its reputation as a friendly place on the map, a spot where neighbors know and help each other.

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This is a story that would likely happen only in a small town that cares.

Two nonprofits in Landrum had the opportunity to come together recently to support a family in need. When a local family found their apartment condemned after a water heater leak and later an explosion, the need was great. Everything the family owned was ruined, either by flooding water or the mold that followed.

Landrum Police Chief Kris Ahler learned of the family’s situation. Even though the family rented a different apartment, there was nothing to move in. Chief Ahler called Susan Tompkins of Operation Hope. Would the agency be able to supply some much-needed groceries and clothes?

Tomkins quickly agreed. The family was able to choose clothes from the Operation Hope store downtown. The Operation Hope pantry supplied groceries. However, the family had very little furniture and no place to sleep.

 

Habitat for Humanity ReStore staff members Jeff Allison (left) and Tyler Hein quickly loaded and delivered essential furniture to the family in need.

Tompkins didn’t stop there. She called Linda Corns of the Thermal Belt Habitat for Humanity ReStore. Would they be able to donate furniture to the family? Corns quickly agreed. Even on a Saturday, she found staff members to load the ReStore truck with essentials and deliver them that day. Before the afternoon was over, the family had a start on their new home with a sofa, tables and beds to sleep in that night.

When we think of small-town living, it’s good to remember the neighbors who care.