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It makes it all worth it

Special cases

By Leonard Rizzo

 

On my last visit to the FHS shelter I noticed volunteers all over, walking and training dog. It was a beautiful Saturday morning and the sight of these animals being prepared for a new life filled my heart. It seemed both the animals and trainers had the same look of joy on their faces.

I checked the board in the office area and saw many smiley faces, which denotes adoption pending. With the recent shut in because of the pandemic I made the assumption that the value of a canine or feline companion grew on some folks.

Anyway, my initial reason for the visit was to see Kayla Parrish and ask how the transfer for one of my kids went (Max). Kayla told me that he was turned over to Doctor Parker from Landrum vet and her son is coming in from Pennsylvania to adopt him. I have subsequently seen Dr. Parker and will be there for the transfer to her son. It seems he has met Max more than once during a stay and fell in love, when he learned Max was still available, an adoption was worked out. I’ll tell more after the transfer which I have been invited to, I hope to get some photos then and give Max my customary kiss between his eyes.

I also received some other wonderful news from Dr. Joe Piccone, my chiropractor and a dear friend. He and I have collaborated more than once getting one of his champion Shepherds to a troubled child. A few years ago, one of those great dogs was Dax. Dax had some skin issues which I took on with Dr. Matthews in Saluda. Many things were tried but finally Dax was stabilized. Dax was placed with a young man with a mild case of autism. All fees for training and the initial price of the dog were kept at a minimum and as usual Dr. Piccone absorbed the rest. Besides relieving my lower back pain, there is a reason I love this man. I learned the young boy is coming into town with Dax; he is now driving and has a girlfriend. I’ve seen photos and Dr. Joe and I agree, Dax looks wonderful. The young man asked to see Mr. Rizzo when he comes in and I fought to hold back tears upon hearing the news.

I’ve handled a few other minor cases since we last spoke, the latest came from Patti Lovelace, our animal control officer. The dog is a one year old pitty name Suge, pronounced like sugar with the R sound. He has some problems in his nether region (penis) and an operation is scheduled with Kelly at Animobile. Patti assures me he is a responsible owner so after speaking with him and Dr. Sulik; I agreed to pay whatever he couldn’t for Suge. Today I’m glad to be alive.

Thanks for listening.