• 68°

Homemade mayonnaise

To the Editor:

If you have never had home made mayonnaise you are missing something in your life. It is more creamy than the commercial brands and perfectly delicious. It takes some work but it is worth particularly when you blend it in a salad dressing, cocktail sauce or with smoked fish or cold poached chicken.

It is never found in restaurants because of the uncooked eggs used; salmonella is the concern. Although there is no test for the presence of salmonella in eggs that I know of, I have my own test. After I prepare a mayonnaise, I give a small sample to one of my neighbors preferably no one elderly with a weak immune system. I call the next day to see how they are feeling.

Here is how to make the mayonnaise courtesy of the Boston Ritz Carltons dining room

Precise Ingredients all at Room Temperature:

4 egg yokes (large eggs at room temperature)

3 1/2 cups vegetable oil

1/4 cup white distilled vinegar

1 tablespoon sugar

2 teaspoons salt

2 teaspoons dry mustard

1/2 teaspoon ground white pepper (black is OK)

2 tablespoons lemon juice

Tools:

Large mixing bowl (stainless steel or glass warmed and dry)

wire whisk

measuring devices

The trick is to carefully emulsify the eggs with the vegetable oil. If you have ever made a Hollandaise Sauce you know to be careful. Beat the egg yokes to a froth then add the dry ingredients and beat for another two minutes or more. Add the oil drop by drop at first while continually beating. After it begins to thicken you may add the oil SLOWLY in a small stream you continue beating never stop until the oil is gone. Add the vinegar periodically by the tablespoon throughout this process.

With a successful emulsion you now have a beautifully textured creamy exceptionally delicious mayonnaise. Beat in the lemon juice and taste. You may adjust with additional salt and pepper but it shouldnt be necessary.

I am told that pregnant women should not attempt this nor should this be made during a thunderstorm. Im also told that you should beat counterclockwise in the northern hemisphere, but that is difficult if you are right handed.

If the mayonnaise should break, you have either add too much oil or have added it too quickly or perhaps used small eggs. The fix is another beater room temperature egg yoke to which you slowly add the broken mayonnaise, again beating continuously.

Gerald Siddons