Hospice of the Carolina Foothills honors nursing home partners May 12-18

Published 5:44pm Friday, May 17, 2013

Social workers, chaplains and bereavement counselors tend to patients’ and families’ emotional and spiritual needs. Trained hospice volunteers spend time with patients — talking, reading, singing and helping them write their life stories as a lasting legacy for their families. Hospice doctors collaborate with nursing home physicians and patients’ personal doctors to coordinate medications and other physical needs. And for patients who love and miss their four-legged friends, “Caring Canines” – trained therapy dogs – bring their wagging tails and unconditional love to brighten the day.

When HCF works with a nursing home, it allows the facility staff to concentrate more fully on their already full day-to-day job responsibilities. Together, they work in balance to greater benefit the patients.

“We make good team partners as we provide combined extra support for the residents and their families,” says Jane Foster, hospice nurse at Autumn Care certified nursing assistants, Debbie Denton, Trish Green and Sharon Hughes have a similar experience as they help care for residents in North Carolina facilities.

“The staff seems very appreciative of having a regular hospice team in their facility. Familiar faces are good for staff, patients and families,” they say.

Caregivers share a mutual goal: to make a patient’s final days dignified and comfortable, surrounded by family, friends, companions, and the kind of professionals who see to their needs with respect and love.

Hospice of the Carolina Foothills is proud to work with these kind of professionals in the nursing homes they serve.

- article submitted by Marsha Van Hecke

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